Reading Storytelling for User Experience by Whitney Quesenbery and Kevin Brooks got me thinking about different ways of exploring ideas in my design process. It inspired me to try something new on a recent project. I found that both the end result and the journey were very rewarding.

Starting with words

For most projects I start with sketches, flow diagrams, or wireframes. The end result is always some sort of visual output. I have my graphic design background to thank for that. With this project, I changed things up a little and described my user journey in writing rather than illustrating it. The end result was like a story about our customer’s journey through our signup process.

I broke each step into a series of bullets that were short and concise. It was important for me to make them easy to read. My self imposed constraint forced me to keep things at a high level. This made it better for collecting feedback and moving onto the next stage of the project because people didn’t get caught up in small details.

Words are cheap

I don’t even need to think when I type because of how long I’ve been using a computer. It’s like I look at a screen and words appear right out my brain. Working on this project in this way made me realize that I can type quicker than I can sketch. I was able to cover lots of ground in less time and generated more ideas than I normally would.

I worked in waves by documenting my thoughts and then editing them. The ideas got better with each edit and sometimes they’d even spark new ones. I had to be diligent to capture them before they escaped. My keyboard skills came in hand as I copy and pasted new phrases, finished them off, and then got back to the original thought. After a while, the content began to mature. and I started to think about the implementation.

Structure brings Freedom

I remember my visual brain going wild while writing these flows. The descriptions painted such vivid pictures. I couldn’t wait to get to the visual part of the project. Once I did, I found it really easy to get going. Working within the constraints of the written text was very fun for me. With the high level details all figured out, I was able to focus on the details and get creative.

Conclusion

With this experience behind me, I can easily say I’d do it again. Heck, I’d like to see if there are other ways I can incorporate words into my design process. I’m going to continue exploring and writing about it here so check back soon. If you have any suggestions let me know, I’d love to hear about them.